Habits Of People Who Know How To Bring Out The Best In Others

  1. THEY FOCUS ON THE PERSON’S STRENGTHS

Good leaders identify the strengths of individual team members and give employees opportunities to use them, says Wellins. “They cultivate and optimize others’ talents and capabilities,” he says.

While some strengths will be obvious, good leaders schedule one-on-one meetings and ask questions such as, “What do you enjoy doing most as part of your work?” and “What do you miss most about the jobs you’ve had in the past and why?”

  1. THEY EMPATHIZE

Leaders who bring out the best in others listen to what team members are saying and put themselves in their shoes, says Wellins. When dealing with an emotional situation, listening and responding with empathy can immediately reduce tension, and until things calm down, nothing productive can occur.

“Empathy will drive better performance; this is a huge motivator,” says Wellins.

  1. THEY GIVE RECOGNITION

People who bring out the best in others also reward and recognize good work. Leaders often worry that praise will seem unprofessional or that employees will become complacent or overconfident.

“It isn’t and they won’t,” says Wellins. “It’s about making a person feel good about themselves even when they feel challenged or are in tough times..”

This is also important when things are going well, adds Wellins. “It’s so simple, but our research shows that one- to two-thirds of leaders are not good at acknowledging good work,” he says.

  1. THEY CONNECT THE RIGHT PEOPLE

Liz Wiseman, author of Rookie Smarts: Why Learning Beats Knowing in the New Game of Work, calls leaders who bring out the best in others “multipliers.” She says multipliers look for talent everywhere and focus on finding people, at whatever level, who know the things they don’t.

“Multipliers take the time to understand the capabilities of each individual so that they can connect employees with the right people and the right opportunities—thereby building a virtuous cycle of attraction, growth, and opportunity,” she writes in an article for Harvard Business Review.

5. THEY DON’T MICROMANAGE

Bringing out the best in others means delegating. “Good managers are careful to not micromanage,” says Wellins. “Their job is to assign or direct general goals in work that needs to be done but they should never do it for the person.”

Stretch goals that push people can have a big impact on how people feel about themselves, their work, and what they can accomplish, says Wellins. “Appeal to their strengths and give them responsibility and they will achieve their goals,” he says.

As team members earn small wins, their confidence grows and seemingly insurmountable problems appear less daunting, adds Wiseman; roadblocks become interesting puzzles for the team to solve.

“Multipliers see themselves as coaches and teachers,” writes Wiseman. “These leaders put a high premium on self-sufficiency: Once they delegate a task or decision, they don’t try to take it back.”

6. THEY CREATE SAFE ENVIRONMENTS

People who bring out the best in others give people permission to think, speak, and act with reason, says Wiseman.

“They generate an intensity that demands high-level work from the team, but they also have a high tolerance for mistakes and understand the importance of learning along the way,” she writes. “So they create mental spaces in which people can flourish.”

What if I told you that you were one of the wealthiest person in the world?

Before you scratch your head and check your wallet, pause for a moment and think about the assets in your life. Not just the dollar bills in the safe, but the other valuables you have. The ones that actually matter.

Sure, money can buy a lot of things — but that’s it. They’re just things. Material possessions are great, but happiness doesn’t come from the items we own. It comes from a toddler’s giggle or your mom’s cooking. It shows up on a sunny day or seeing your best friend walk down the aisle.

When it comes down to it, the riches in our bank accounts don’t compare to the seven riches below. Here’s evidence that the best things in life don’t cost a single penny.

Hugs.

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Admit it, there’s nothing like a warm embrace from someone you care about. Hugs can do a lot more than just make you feel good for a split moment. Research shows they may lower your blood pressure and boost your heart. Not bad for a small (and free!) gesture.

Friends and family.

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You can’t put a price point on your loved ones. They’re worth everything without costing a single dime (except for maybe those few bucks you let them borrow for that smoothie when they were short). It’s a small price to pay when you consider the real value they add to your life. Studies suggest that friendships bring huge health perks, from increased longevity to improve mood.

Smiles.

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According to one 2012 study, people who received a smile from strangers felt a greater sense of social connection. And who doesn’t want to feel like they belong? Not to mention those “knowing smiles” you share with your best friends after an inside joke. So go on and flash those pearly whites.

Sleep.

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Happiness is a satisfying nap or a good night’s rest. Sometimes there’s just no better feeling than crawling into a comfortable bed and letting our minds drift away to dreamland. The body and the brain suffers dramatically without proper sleep. Better health for just a little more shuteye? That’s invaluable.

Laughter.

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It’s hard not to feel your absolute best when you’re in the middle of a belly-aching fit of laughter. It also has incredible health benefits. Research suggests that laughing may boost our memory and can lower stress. Hey, the giggles look good on you (and they probably cost less than that shirt).

Happy memories.

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Let’s be honest, who hasn’t replayed some of their best times in their head? (Bonus points if you let it play in a montage like a movie.) Nostalgia is one of our mind’s greatest indulgences — and it’s totally OK to embrace it. Think back on your perfect prom or your wonderful wedding day. Research shows we spend 47 percent of our waking hours daydreaming, so why not put it to good use?

Love.

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The Beatles were most certainly onto something when they crooned in their 1960s hit, “All You Need Is Love.” Feeling accepted is crucial to our emotional wellness. We’re happier, our immune system is stronger and even our heart health is improved when we’re around the people we love.

So, go hug your best friend, kiss your significant other, create good memories with your family and make a stranger feel loved with a simple smile (and then go to sleep). All without draining your pocketbook.

 

Proven Benefits of Green Tea

Green tea is the healthiest beverage on the planet. It is loaded with antioxidants and nutrients that have powerful effects on the body. This includes improved brain function, fat loss, a lower risk of cancer and many other incredible benefits.

Here are some health benefits of green tea that have been confirmed in human research studies.

Green Tea Contains Bio-active Compounds That Improve Health

Green tea is more than just green liquid.

Many of the bioactive compounds in the tea leaves do make it into the final drink, which contains large amounts of important nutrients.

It is loaded with polyphenols like flavonoids and catechins, which function as powerful antioxidants.

These substances can reduce the formation of free radicals in the body, protecting cells and molecules from damage. These free radicals are known to play a role in aging and all sorts of diseases.

One of the more powerful compounds in green tea is the antioxidant Epigallocatechin Gallate (EGCG), which has been studied to treat various diseases and may be one of the main reasons green tea has such powerful medicinal properties.

Green tea also has small amounts of minerals that are important for health.

Compounds in Green Tea Can Improve Brain Function and Make You Smarter

Green tea does more than just keep you awake, it can also make you smarter.

The key active ingredient is caffeine, which is a known stimulant.

It doesn’t contain as much as coffee, but enough to produce a response without causing the “jittery” effects associated with too much caffeine.

What caffeine does in the brain is to block an inhibitory neurotransmitter called Adenosine. This way, it actually increases the firing of neurons and the concentration of neurotransmitters like dopamine and norepinephrine.

Caffeine has been intensively studied before and consistently leads to improvements in various aspects of brain function, including improved mood, vigilance, reaction time and memory.

However… green tea contains more than just caffeine. It also has the amino acid L-theanine, which is able to cross the blood-brain barrier.

L-theanine increases the activity of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA, which has anti-anxiety effects. It also increases dopamine and the production of alpha waves in the brain.

Studies show that caffeine and L-theanine can have synergistic effects. The combination of the two is particularly potent at improving brain function (10).

Because of the L-theanine and the smaller dose of caffeine, green tea can give you a much milder and different kind of “buzz” than coffee.

 

Green Tea Increases Fat Burning and Improves Physical Performance

If you look at the ingredients list for any fat burning supplement, chances are that green tea will be on there.

This is because green tea has been shown to increase fat burning and boost the metabolic rate, in human controlled trials.

 

Green Tea May Protect Your Brain in Old Age, Lowering Your Risk of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s

Not only can green tea improve brain function in the short term, it may also protect your brain in old age.

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common neurodegenerative disease in humans and a leading cause of dementia.

Parkinson’s disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease and involves the death of dopamine producing neurons in the brain.

Multiple studies show that the catechin compounds in green tea can have various protective effects on neurons in test tubes and animal models, potentally lowering the risk of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

Green Tea Can Kill Bacteria, Which Improves Dental Health and Lowers Your Risk of Infection

The catechins in green tea have other biological effects as well.

Some studies show that they can kill bacteria and inhibit viruses like the influenza virus, potentially lowering your risk of infections.

Streptococcus mutans is the primary harmful bacteria in the mouth. It causes plaque formation and is a leading contributor to cavities and tooth decay.

Studies show that the catechins in green tea can inhibit the growth of streptococcus mutans. Green tea consumption is associated with improved dental health and a lower risk of caries.

Another awesome benefit of green tea… multiple studies show that it can reduce bad breath.

Cardiovascular Disease

Cardiovascular diseases, including heart disease and stroke, are the biggest causes of death in the world.

Studies show that green tea can improve some of the main risk factors for these diseases.

This includes total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides

Green tea also dramatically increases the antioxidant capability of the blood, which protects the LDL cholesterol particles from oxidation, which is one part of the pathway towards heart disease.

Given the beneficial effects on risk factors, it is not surprising to see that green tea drinkers have up to a 31% lower risk of cardiovascular disease.

Green Tea Can Help You Lose Weight and Lower Your Risk of Becoming Obese

Given that green tea can boost the metabolic rate in the short term, it makes sense that it could help you lose weight.

Several studies show that green tea leads to decrease  in body fat, especially in the abdominal area.

One of these studies was a randomized controlled trial in 240 men and women that went on for 12 weeks. In this study, the green tea group had significant decreases in body fat percentage, body weight, waist circumference and abdominal fat.

However, some studies don’t show a statistically significant increases in weight loss with green tea, so this needs to be taken with a grain of.